Stagno Torto

Stagno Torto

Stagno Torto is an inlet on the eastern side of La Maddalena, where at the end the sea water is mostly flat, resembling that of a pond. There is a small private marina.

Marginetto

Marginetto Presutti

Marginetto Presutti

Marginetto is located on the north coast of La Maddalena. Here there are some villas built in the 60s as well as some small and evocative beaches, the access to which is partly hidden: that is why they are mostly frequented by experts of the territory.

Monti della Rena

Monti della Rena - Foto by Orecchioni

Monti della Rena – Foto by Orecchioni

In the northern coast of La Maddalena, easily accessible by the scenic route, we can find one of the island’s largest beaches, within a large bay: Monti della Rena. It is named after a sandy hill on the eastern side, which is often used as a playground by kids.

Abbatoggia

Abbatoggia Foto by Ferrigno

Abbatoggia Foto by Ferrigno

Abbatoggia is one of two granite extremities on the north of La Maddalena island. It runs along a peninsula which houses a camping as well as many beaches: among these, the first is called il Morto (the Dead), due to a rough grave of a soldier still clearly visible and located on the eastern side of the shore. The second, lo Strangolato (the Strangled) is so called for the narrow strip of land; finally, at the end of Abbatoggia, we can find Punta Cannone beach, with its cream-colored, coarse sand and emerald sea water that becomes immediately deep.

Hell Bay

Cala d'Inferno

Cala d’Inferno

Cala d’Inferno (Hell Bay), on the western coast, is a big bay exposed to the northwest winds. Its name is referred to the “hellish” aspect of its perpetually rough sea. The beach is accessible only on foot by two paths of discrete length. The first starts form the scenic route, just before the fortress of i Colmi; the second starts from Trinita village – a residential complex, formerly inhabited by militaries of the United States Navy.

Carlotto and La Madonnetta

La Madonnetta Foto by Ferrigno

La Madonnetta Foto by Ferrigno

Carlotto and La Madonnetta is a beautiful bay on the western coast, wich ends with a characteristic small beach sheltered from the winds. It takes its name from the nearby military anti-aircraft battery. The side facing Spargi hosts, on a rocky spur, a votive chapel – called La Madonnetta – founded by the old fisherman Michele Scotto as a devotional tribute to the Virgin who reportedly saved him during a storm. Here, every 1st of May celebrations are held in honour of the Virgin, an anniversary much felt by La Maddalena citizens.

Bassa Trinita

Bassa Trinita

Bassa Trinita

Bassa Trinità is probably the most famous and visited beach in the island. It is one of the main attractions of the Archipelago, thanks to its fine white sand, the blue and turquoise sea water. It takes its name from its location (in the past defined Abbassu ‘a Trinita), that is down the slopes of the hill where stands the homonymous church. You can reach it by car from the panoramic road and then walking on a system of boardwalks that protect an enchanting belt of sand and wild dunes. In the past, these dunes – now protected by the rules of the National Park – occupied a larger space up to the asphalt roadway, and over.

Porto Massimo

Porto Massimo

Porto Massimo is a small residential area on the east coast. It houses a private marina, a hotel, two coffee bars and several small apartments for tourist use. Even now it is considered a popular destination for middle and higher class visitors. In the 1980s and 1990s, it was at the core of the summer nightlife thanks to a suggestive discotheque on the sea: the Cormorano. Still today La Maddalena citizens and tourists preserve a delightful memory of it.

Cala Lunga

Cala Lunga Coppadoro

Foto by Coppadoro

Cala Lunga is an inlet with blue and transparent waters, ending with a small, beige sandy beach, suitable for children’s games.

Museo Diocesano

Museo Diocesano

In the city centre, behind the church, there is the Diocesan Museum, where we can find some objects of worship: statues, offerings to the Patron Saint, furniture, a small 18th century Dormitio Virginis with its wardrobe and an interesting collection of prints of Saint Mary Magdalene donated by Giusto Davoli. Two candlesticks and a silver crucifix donated in 1804 by Admiral Nelson are very important from an historical point of view. With his fleet, the Admiral often stationed in the Archipelago waiting for Napoleon’s ships coming out from the port of Toulon. He considered the central position in the Mediterranean of La Maddalena strategic and believed that England might acquire it to safeguard its maritime interests. During the two years of his Mediterranean cruises, Nelson stopped eight times with his ship Victory in our sea, getting supplies and valuable information from a tested system of espionage.